Wit and Wisdom from the Kitchen: A Lifetime of Cooking Knowledge, Passed Down from Generations of Food Lovers

This unusual cookbook is about as inconvenient in the kitchen as it possibly can be. Wit and Wisdom from the Kitchen has no table of contents, no index, not even page numbers. It seems like this is author Dominique Devito’s personal notes waiting to be organized. Should you want to cook a previously tried recipe, the only way to find it is to page through the book.

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Perfectly Paleo: Recipes for clean eating on a Paleo diet

This beautifully illustrated and expensively produced cookbook, Perfect Paleo, seems like a nice addition to the library of Paleo cooks. Rosa Rigby didn’t write this for the beginner cooks, and even the intermediate home cooks will be challenged. Most of the recipes are complex and time consuming, sometimes preparing three, even four preparations before the final step.

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Tasty Dessert: All the Sweet You Can Eat (An Official Tasty Cookbook)

Just looking at this colorful cookbook made me so happy. As someone who views Tasty cooking videos online, I was delighted to receive a copy of Tasty Dessert: All the Sweet You Can Eat (An Official Tasty Cookbook). The book is organized into seven descriptive chapters: “Dense & Fudge,” “Crunchy, Crackly, Crispy,” “Chewy & Gooey” “Juicy & Fruity,” “Creamy Dreamy,” “Soft & Fluffy,” and “Drippy & Oozy.” Now, if just reading those didn’t make your mouth water, I don’t know what will.

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Alimentari : Salads + Other Classics from a Little Deli that Grew

Is this a picture book or a cookbook? Alimentari by Linda and Paul Jones is filled with photos—close to half of the pages are photographs: mostly of foods and scenes of the authors’ deli called Alimentari but also of people, dogs, babies, and so on. But where is this deli, besides being on Brunswick Street? Neither in the foreword nor in the long introduction does the name of the city or country appear. The recipe units first listed are metric, inconvenient for American cooks as they end up measuring in fractions. Professionals downsizing recipes into home kitchens are occasionally successful—not these authors. Only the simplest recipes are within easy reach of a home cook. Many items are given in a commercial kitchen like aioli, pesto, tomato chutney, dukkah, and Lebanese pie dough. And where do home cooks find items like haloumi, nigella seeds, burrata, or shanklish, among other impossible ingredients? Or how many home cooks would attempt a wood-fired suckling pig? The recipes are good, many with a long list of ingredients, and are most well beyond the average home cook’s ability or patience. The cooking times acceptable for restaurant range are far too short for home kitchens. The index is good. But you don’t need this cookbook.

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BAKING SUBSTITUTIONS: The A-Z of Common, Unique, and Hard- to- Find Ingredients

In the entire list of Jean B. Macleod’s How-To publications, BAKING SUBSTITUTIONS: The A-Z of Common, Unique, and Hard-to-Find Ingredients is perhaps the most interesting. In creating a catalog that provides suggestions that allow the replacement of less easily sourced ingredients, Macleod has consequently opened our eyes to a wide spectrum of unlikely ingredients. For obvious reasons, the ingredients used in everyday baking tend to exist within our general shopping spheres and don’t include ingredients such as mosto cotto, guar gum, or caciocavallo, and as a result, most will not have heard of these before. Macleod’s guide is fantastically dynamic in providing ideas of how to replace missing baking items while also helping you to make healthier recipes, save money, imitate branded products, or conform to dietary requirements. But in explaining the nature and use of ingredients like sacha inchi oil, matzo, and ashtar, as well as which ingredients may be used in their place, her book becomes a catalog of the everyday and the more exotic components of baking.

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Cooking with Bear: A Story and Recipes from the Forest

It’s been a long winter, and even though it’s still a bit chilly out, Bear is ready to get up and find some food! He starts off with a big pot of soup, but then his friend Fox comes to visit. When Bear discovers that Fox wants to learn some new recipes, the two venture out into the springtime to gather ingredients and inspiration. From the forest and their other friends, Bear and Fox find nuts, berries, greens, and more. Each ingredient finds its way into one of Bear’s fun recipes, and Fox is hungry for more!

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Everyday Dorie: The Way I Cook by Dorie Greenspan

Here is a beautifully produced, promising cookbook with a huge selection of recipes. Author Dorie Greenspan promises in her introduction simple dishes that are “comforting, satisfying and inviting.” Everyday Dorie only partially fulfills this promise. The recipes are anything but simple; many call for a long list of ingredients. To prepare the dishes, the cook needs to be skillful and experienced. The recipes and instructions are extremely detailed, and the head-notes are worth reading. Many recipes are based on the French cooking style–they are more sophisticated than simple.

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The Everything Keto Diet Meal Prep Cookbook

Full revelation: I cook and eat primarily at home and have dropped thirty pounds on a rather casual Keto regimen. On a Keto diet, boredom can become an inhibiting factor. This book offers a most promising counter to that boredom. In standard “keto” practice, there are widely available lists of permitted and non-permitted foods. All too often introducing variety can mean recipes so elaborate or time-consuming that the practitioner is thrown back on boring and quick. The core of this book’s value is meal prep. Recipes that can be prepared in advance, in quantities that lend themselves to being saved and served over days, rather than for just single meals, make for real-world time-saving.

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Tex-Mex Cookbook: Traditions, Innovations, and Comfort Foods from Both Sides of the Border

Mexican food is extremely popular in this country, but as one travels around, it becomes apparent that different areas have appropriated these tasty recipes and changed them to suit the area. Texas has its own brand of Mexican food referred to as TexMex, and it is good, good, good, incorporating spices, chili peppers, lots of cheese, and a great deal of frying. The introductory pages cover the writers and their backgrounds, what is meant by TexMex, and what you need to have in your chochina.

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Feeding the Future: Clean Eating for Children & Families

We are learning more every day about the dangers of the “standard American diet” filled with sugar, preservatives, and other food additives. It’s especially problematic for kids; foods that aren’t truly nourishing can lead to sleep issues, attention problems, and excess weight, among other things. But many parents struggle with feeding their kids nourishing, clean food, and that’s where a cookbook like Feeding the Future can help. Author Tali Shine and nutritional therapist Lohralee Astor have created a wide variety of kid-friendly recipes that are made with nutritious, whole foods and no refined sugar.

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